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Texas Folklife

Folk and Traditional Arts of Texas

Research

Most recent articles, events, video, audio and blog posts for this page:
  • Posted on Thu Oct 31, 2013
    Elements of an altar to La Santa Muerte Our presentation at BookWoman inspired us to build a mini altar to the Santa Muerte as demonstration.  We got most of our information from Andrew Chesnut's book, "Devoted to Death," and from a documentary by Mexican filmmaker Eva Aridjis.   Here's a list of items that are typically seen in a Santa Muerte altar, and pictures of our version at...

    I Call Her 'La Flaca'

  • Posted on Thu Oct 31, 2013
    Last weekend I attended the Blackpot Festival in Lafayette for the first time. Blackpot is a music and food festival celebrating the culture of Southern Louisiana's Acadiana Region. There is a wide range of musical styles and a variety of foods, each being prepared in - you guessed it: black pots. One of the things I found interesting was the similarities between this region and the Gulf Coast...
  • Posted on Tue Oct 29, 2013
    Texas Folklife fieldworker Julie Ardery recently conducted research at Wursbraten for our Foodways: A Place at the Table program. Check out this year's event! 42nd Annual Wurstbraten Zion Lutheran Church & SchoolWalburg, Texas Monday, November 4, 2013Serving 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.Adults $10.00  Children $6.00 (12 & under)Homemade Desserts $2.00Fast and Convenient Drive-Thru Line...
  • Posted on Wed Oct 23, 2013
    Support Your Feminist Bookstore, She Supports You! BookWoman began 38 years ago in an upstairs shop on Guadalupe. We started out as a collective called The Common Woman Bookstore (based on the Judy Grahn poem). From there we moved into Susan Post's house at the time, and then we became BookWoman and moved to 6th Street. Then we moved to 12th and Lamar, and since 2008 we're located at 5501...
  • Posted on Wed Oct 9, 2013
    On Tuesday April 2nd I attended Cyril 'Big Chief Iron Horse' Green's funeral in New Orleans.   As Big Chief or leader of the Black Seminoles Mardi Gras Indian tribe, Iron Horse was a well-respected community leader of New Orleans' 8th ward.  His use of a wheel-chair earned him his nickname, but Iron Horse didn't let his condition slow him down. Green was involved...
  • Posted on Thu Oct 3, 2013
    La Santa Muerte ˆ Mexican Folk Saint Personifying Death A relatively new and controversial folk saint has emerged in the Americas ˆ La Santa Muerte (Saint Death or Most Holy Death,) a syncretic version of the European grim reaper influenced by Meso-American views on death and folk religion. Most media accounts of Santa Muerte focus on the faith practices of traffickers and murderers, but in...
  • Posted on Mon May 28, 2018
    Free general admission with RSVPTexas Folklife and the Workers Defense Project invite the public to join us for the premiere of our new radio series, "Immigration and Labor: Stories from the Texas Workforce," as well as a talk by Dr. Suzanne Seriff of the University of Texas at Austin on her work in folklore.  This series of audio documentaries about labor, immigration, and workers has...
  • Posted on Thu Mar 22, 2018
    In February 2018, Texas Folklife hosted a discussion at Larry’s French Market & Cajun Restaurant about how the organization can support efforts of the community to encourage youth participation in Cajun traditional music.  The community discussion touched on three main topics: the reasons behind decline in youth participation in Cajun music in Southeast Texas; comparisons between...
  • Posted on Tue Mar 22, 2016
    Folklorist / NPR & BBC radio producer Rachel Hopkin will be returning to present a sampling of her work in radio and folklore, as well as completed audio documentaries produced at the Stories Summer Institute by this year’s participants. The presentation and reception on July 22nd is free and open to the public. The reception begins at 6PM, followed by the...
  • Posted on Mon May 19, 2014
    This post is long overdue, but it's important that I get something down while the events are still somewhat fresh in my mind.  I try to travel to New Orleans at least once a year, both for the pure fun and enjoyment the city provides, but also to stay in touch with people and communities I have worked with over the years.  Last year I attended a second line funeral for Mardi Gras Indian...

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